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the presidency, said, and the house and did not like george bush very much. sure hated losing to them in 2004. they did not quit. they kept working. they took the house and the senate and the white house. it played by the rules. we took them back in 2010. never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. these things are difficult because it is always easy to say try it. we are doing is now working. usually what that means is we need to work harder for we doing . i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. i hated it. it took 16 years to get ronald reagan. but when we got ronald reagan it changed america and the world and ended the old soviet system. so democracy is hard work, stuff like this, people going in knocking on doors, people, you know, going out and voting. we do it. our system works. it's hard to work, and it's hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. very afraid of centralized powerful government. it will make this difficult to do. but power announcer representatives with the people, the states every year, president that for four ye
a call from george w. bush and the former president said to mitt romney don't worry about the debate. you are going to do fine. i know from my own experience the president is not going to be fully prepared. this is in fact a truism. and, in president to run for re-election often you lose the first debate that they have. there are a lot of reasons. one is they haven't been spoken to for four years in the way they are about to be spoken to by their opponent traded their aides are somewhat more respectful than their opponents on the debate stage. second, they think they're prepared because they have dealing with these issues and they don't feel like they need to freshen up three of he didn't have a good mock debate in his mock debates were from mediocre to really bad. the day of the debate i ran into one of his people in the morning in denver who said what do you think? this person said i'm really worried trade i don't think he's ready for tonight and i'm worried about what is going to happen. as a result of that the stakes were a lot higher in later debates and there was a great moment when
served as the chief economist of the council of economic advisers under president george bush. manuel pastor is the professor of sociology in american studies and ethnicity at the university of southern california. he's also the director of their program on environmental and region aleck bity -- regional equity, and for our purposes today most importantly, codirector of the center for the study of immigrant integration. and he's published a couple of reports recently that he'll bring to light today about the importance of citizenship. jose antonio vargas is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist, film maker and the founder of define american, a campaign that seeks to elevate the immigration conversation. he is another profile in courage. in 2011 in "the new york times" magazine, he publicly revealed himself as undocumented and shared his life story of being raised by his grandparents in the u.s. from the age of 12 when he left his birthplace in the philippines. he has since become a national immigrants' rights advocate and leader for comprehensive immigration reform activist including th
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impeachment. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very -- i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know, what? that's the price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i
assistant to president george w. bush and principal deputy press secretary. and john verrico, president-elect of the national association of government communicators. so starting with carolyn, let's hear what you have to say, just give us your overview of the subject. >> i'm going to tell you about a couple surveys i've conducted this year and the previous year. that are relevant to the topic we're discussing tonight. first, i surveyed reporters who cover federal agencies here in washington. i've got 146 respondents within margin of error of about 7%. then i surveyed current and former members of the national association of government communicators, about 154 responses for a margin of error of about 4.3%. i'm going to throw some numbers at you but i want to quantify the situation. my questions focus on the interviewing process. first, i want to talk about preapproval and routing. 98% of public affairs officers believe that they have a better idea than reporters about who in their agencies would be the best person to give an interview on a given topic. three quarters of journalists repor
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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